Not feeling motivated? Take action!

This is the first post that I have written this year.  Up until this point I had found myself at a loss for what to write about.  Was this a case of “writer’s block” or was it just a lack of motivation?  I was finding it difficult to motivate myself to write.

Earlier this month I read “Six Figures in Six Months” by Peter Voogd.  Thank goodness that I did!  In his book the author mentions that it is action that results in motivation being generated.  It’s not just a moment of action but action that takes place on a frequency to where it becomes habitual.  How many of us feel that we must first feel motivated in order to act? Now in the case of a situation involving imminent danger motivation (or paralyzing fear) could come into play.  But the author brings up the point that in order for a person to continuously feel motivated about doing something, the person must push themselves to the point of taking applicable action on a regular basis for the feelings of motivation to come about.

The topic of establishing rituals for the purpose of facilitating that process of goal accomplishment is discussed.  This involves embarking on a course of regular actions that apply to the goal in question.  The purpose of the regular actions are to make the tasks shift from being perceived as a chore to where they become habits.

An example of this which I am currently experiencing is my taking the time to ride a bicycle on a regular basis. After taking the first ride one day, I decided to make a commitment to setting a new time for when I would take the next ride.  Oh sure, I was experiencing mental hurdles that came about from the feeling that both my legs would give out on me but I pushed on. I was very surprised at the realization that if I did not go for a ride as soon as I got home; I would succumb to the temptation of sitting down either in front of the TV or the computer and basically get no exercise for the rest of the day.

At first, there were several occasions where I would not go through with taking the bike ride but I noticed that once I was in a rhythm of taking rides on a regular basis, it became much easier.  I was also more inclined to get on the bike and go and not experience the mental hangups that I was dealing with previously.  Over the course of time, the bike rides have been getting easier physically and I am taking rides over longer distances.

Now you might ask yourself how this information would apply to the aspiring entrepreneur? Well if one decides to “wait for the perfect moment” of inspiration to come, it may never happen.  Voogt states to the effect that one must become clear on what it is that they want to accomplish. Not only does the need to be clear apply to any given day; it also applies to what one wishes to achieve in the upcoming weeks as well as months.

In addition, he recommends that at the beginning of each and every day, a decision (in writing) is made as to what is going to be accomplished.  From there, the individual needs to hold themselves accountable to ensuring that the task for that day ends up being accomplished. The necessity for staying on task and resisting any distractions is emphasized.

So with this in mind, performing things on a regular basis to the point where they become habitual (some studies say 21 days?) will help do away with the perceived drudgery that could ensue.  As a result, the journey taken towards goal accomplishment stands a much greater chance of being a relatively easier one.

My thanks to the author for sharing this concept which has make a positive impression upon me.